Senior Care Family Advisors
Serving San Antonio & the Texas Hill Country

When memory care issues become more than you can handle

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Photo by {artist}/{collectionName} / Getty Images

10 EARLY SIGNS AND SYMPTOMS OF ALZHEIMER'S DISEASE

1. MEMORY LOSS THAT DISRUPTS DAILY LIFE

2. CHALLENGES IN PLANNING OR SOLVING PROBLEMS

3. DIFFICULTY COMPLETING FAMILIAR TASKS AT HOME, AT WORK OR AT LEISURE

4. CONFUSION WITH TIME OR PLACE

5. TROUBLE UNDERSTANDING VISUAL IMAGES AND SPATIAL RELATIONSHIPS

6. NEW PROBLEMS WITH WORDS IN SPEAKING OR WRITING

7. MISPLACING THINGS AND LOSING THE ABILITY TO RETRACE STEPS

8. DECREASED OR POOR JUDGMENT

9. WITHDRAWAL FROM WORK OR SOCIAL ACTIVITIES

10. CHANGES IN MOOD AND PERSONALITY

Learn More from the Alzheimer's Association

Dementia and Alzheimer's 

Memory loss could be a sign that you or your loved one needs help. Senior Care Family Advisors will visit with you about what's going on and put a game plan together to appropriately address your needs. Utilizing a cognitive assessment is the first step in mapping out your care needs and in concert with your doctors and family, we will create an action plan together.

Most people have heard of dementia and Alzheimer's Disease and the definition of both is mentioned below:

Dementia is the name for a group of symptoms caused by disorders that affect the brain. It is not a specific disease. People with dementia may not be able to think well enough to do normal activities, such as getting dressed or eating. They may lose their ability to solve problems or control their emotions. Their personalities may change. They may become agitated or see things that are not there.

Memory loss is a common symptom of dementia. However, memory loss by itself does not mean you have dementia. People with dementia have serious problems with two or more brain functions, such as memory and language. 

Alzheimer's disease (AD) is the most common form of dementia among older people. Dementia is a brain disorder that seriously affects a person's ability to carry out daily activities.

AD begins slowly. It first involves the parts of the brain that control thought, memory and language. People with AD may have trouble remembering things that happened recently or names of people they know. A related problem, mild cognitive impairment (MCI), causes more memory problems than normal for people of the same age. Many, but not all, people with MCI will develop AD.

In AD, over time, symptoms get worse. People may not recognize family members. They may have trouble speaking, reading or writing. They may forget how to brush their teeth or comb their hair. Later on, they may become anxious or aggressive, or wander away from home. Eventually, they need total care. This can cause great stress for family members who must care for them.

AD usually begins after age 60. The risk goes up as you get older. Your risk is also higher if a family member has had the disease.

No treatment can stop the disease. However, some drugs may help keep symptoms from getting worse for a limited time.

At Senior Care Family Advisors, we understand the challenges facing families with a loved one facing dementia and Alzheimer's disease and we can help.